Vale darkroom tongs

Developer tongs finally die.
My Developer tongs finally died this week.

I have been using these tongs in my darkroom for such a long time. I can only hazard a guess and say I began using them at least 15 years ago, I built my darkroom in the garage around 2000-2001.

It’s funny how you put up with things. As soon as I grabbed a fresh pair my ability to work with wet prints in developer then improved immeasurably.

Still getting 15 plus years out of a piece of equipment is pretty good in this day and age of new hardware and software every 18 months.

Side by side comparison iPhone 7 & iPhone XS

Here are two images made on the same spot, albeit under different lighting conditions, and two  months apart using the iPhone 7 and the iPhone XS. I didn’t quite match the compositions either.

iPhone 7 picture from July
iPhone 7 picture from July, corner Stanford and couch Streets, Sunshine
iPhone XS picture from September
iPhone XS picture from September, corner Stanford & Couch Streets, Sunshine
100% crop of the iPhone 7 picture
100% crop of the iPhone 7 picture
100% crop of the iPhone XS picture
100% crop of the iPhone XS picture

 

Confessions of a former instagram addict!

In 2010 when Instagram was one of the fledgling companies offering photo-sharing via iPhones and smartphones generally, I jumped onboard. Like so many others, I thought that I might to gain some traction in the online arm of the photo world. How naive. In retrospect I had been using several platforms to post Phone camera… Continue reading Confessions of a former instagram addict!

What is Flickr?

I was recently asked. What is Flickr? [The Verge reported in March 2013 that Flickr had a total of 87 million registered members and more than 3.5 million new images uploaded daily*.] Well actually, make that; over the years I have been asked, what is Flickr? One of the recent questioners has a SmugMug account and… Continue reading What is Flickr?

Old School. New School.

Researching analogue processes this week for work has lead me down a veritable rabbit hole of information. I am teaching a process that requires a certain level of finesse and attention to detail. Also this is a particular part of the process that I have not had to draw on in my own practice for some… Continue reading Old School. New School.

More Annoucements!

Recently I entered into and was selected to participate in a series of workshops run by SBS, & the CCP, in conjunction with Brimbank council on a photo documentary project about Sunshine. Coincidentally I decided to undertake some professional development using a professional level medium format digital camera. Combining both seemed natural so I’m out… Continue reading More Annoucements!

Awesome Algorithm?

Reading my RSSS news feed this morning I stumbled upon an article about an new service in beta testing that helps designers and image editors who have to browse through large numbers of low-quality photographs  before they find the stock image that is most suitable for their purposes. Now, a new algorithm has been created to… Continue reading Awesome Algorithm?

I Love Flickr!

Vojvodina, Serbia

Vojvodina, Serbia
The Copernicus Sentinel-2A satellite takes us over northern Serbia to the region of Vojvodina.

The area pictured lies in the southern part of a region covered by the Pannonian Sea some 2–23 million years ago. Today, the land boasts a fertile soil – hence the plethora of agricultural fields visible as geometric shapes, reminiscent of cubist artwork.

The Tisza river snakes down from the north. Curved, brushstroke-like light green areas primarily along the east side of the river reveal its former course. Some of these areas are now used for agriculture, while others may still be too wet.

We can also see manmade waterways appearing as straight black lines – likely for draining the swamps, transportation and irrigation.

Nestled among the fields, there are a number of small towns with grid layouts. This type of city planning was invented by ancient Greece’s Hippodamus – known as the ‘father of European urban planning’.

The image captured on 28 August 2016 is clearly in false colour, and different colours indicate varying vegetative states. For example, yellowish patches indicate soil or freshly ploughed land, while shades of blue (primarily in the lower left) indicate either the same crop or different crops at a similar stage of growth.

Sentinel-2’s main instrument has 13 spectral bands, and is designed to provide images that can be used to distinguish between different crop types as well as data on numerous plant features, such as active chlorophyll content and leaf water content, all of which are essential to accurately monitor plant growth.

This kind of information helps informed decisions to be made, whether they are about deciding how much water or fertiliser is needed for a maximum harvest or for forming strategies to address climate change.

While this has obvious economic benefits, this kind of information is also important for developing countries where food security is an issue.

This image is featured on the Earth from Space video programme.